Domestic violence, according to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, affects millions of American households each year. Though majority of victims are women (about 1.3 million women are abused by their partner every year), a survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says that 40% of the total number of victims of severe, physical domestic violence are actually men. These men, however, are not those who are too weak to fight back, rather, they are those who do not wish fight back; those who would rather be hurt than hurt their partner.

Anyway, whether the victim is a man or a woman, the fact that domestic violence or domestic abuse causes pain and destroy lives cannot be contested. No uniform definition of domestic violence exists in all U.S. states; some definitions say that domestic violence is an abusive, or a pattern of abusive, act/behavior committed against a person (the victim) with whom the perpetrator of the act has an intimate or sexual relationship with, such as a spouse, a dating partner or a sexual partner. Some definitions, on the other hand, include all persons in a domestic relationship; thus, besides a spouse, this will include children and other relatives living with the aggressor (some other states even include in their list of persons protected by domestic violence laws, a former spouse, a former sexual or dating partner, an in-law, a step-parent, and a step-child.

Domestic abuse can be physical, emotional, psychological, sexual, or economic in nature. It can also be threats of action that can influence another person; these threats include actions intended frighten, hurt, injure, intimidate, terrorize, humiliate, or manipulate another. Specific actions that are considered as abuse include punching, hitting, kicking, shoving, pushing, sexual assault, intimidation, stalking, withholding money, constant or repeated name-calling, isolating a partner from others, wielding a weapon against someone, and so forth.

Criminal prosecution of domestic violence charges fall under assault and battery laws, menacing, harassment, or false imprisonment (a tort and a common-law felony due to the act of restraining a person in a restricted area without justification or consent).

According to a Nashville domestic violence defense attorney, when police officers respond to an incident of alleged domestic violence, state law mandates that the preferred response of officers is to arrest the primary aggressor. Though this law is intended to protect victims of domestic violence, it may also force the hand of the police to make arrests that they may not have to do otherwise. Regardless of the events that led to an arrest, the severity of a domestic violence accusation, whether it is true or baseless, will require an accused to hire a highly-competent domestic violence defense attorney for the best possible defense that may save him/her from conviction, as well as for him/her to clear his/her record of the charges made against him/her – for the protection of his/her rights and future.